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Home > New Book by Dr. Montgomery Examines the Christian Faith

New Book by Dr. Montgomery Examines the Christian Faith

January 17th, 2013

By Chelsea Rankin.

CONTACT:  David Halbrook
Patrick Henry College
(540) 441-8722
OfficeOfCommunications@phc.edu

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 Dr. Montgomery's new book

John Warwick Montgomery’s recently published a new book, entitled Christ as Center and Circumference: Essays Theological, Cultural, and Polemic, is a compilation of scholarly essays examining the Christian faith and classical Christianity’s ability to resolve difficult issues prevalent in modernity.

Montgomery, PHC’s Distinguished Research Professor of Philosophy and Christian Thought, not only believes in the preservation of apologetic study, he allows that he would not have become Christian had it not been for an apologist he met at Cornell University. “He had better answers than I had objections to the faith,” recalls Montgomery. In the aftermath of this encounter, Montgomery said he dedicated his life to the study of apologetics. Today he believes that Christians need to dust off their apologetics books and devote themselves to a study of facts.

“Too many Christians, in neglecting apologetics, leave the inhabitants of a secular society with no effective witness because they don't care enough to defend the faith – or don't know how to do it,” he says.

Montgomery opens his book with a quote from Sherlock Holmes, “Facts, facts, facts. It is a capital mistake to theorize in advance of the facts.” Throughout the narrative, Montgomery seeks to present a factual based argument for his faith.

Dr. John Warwick Montgomery

“…modern unbelief departs from factual reality in favor of unsupportable speculation, leaving its advocates in a never-never land without hope either in this world or in the next,” he writes.

Further writing that it is paramount to believe what has been proven to be knowledge, he cites his concern for the lackluster Christianity so prevalent in today’s society. His observations tell him that when Christians seek to change the world, they try to do so through politics. And while he does not downplay the importance of political activism, he hopes more Christians will devote themselves to a study of God’s Truth.

“Modern evangelicals are often either subjectively orientated (in terms of their personal spiritual experience) or concerned chiefly with politics (changing the society at large),” Montgomery says. “We need more Christians whose focal center is the objective truth of the Bible and the historic factuality of Christ's claims – rather than their own sanctification and/or conservative politics.”